Tagged: online learning

It’s Back to School! 5 Habits of Highly Successful Online College Students

Posted by Debi Teter
StudentAh, it’s that time of year that parents all across the country anticipate more than their kids anticipate Santa’s visit. It’s time to send the kiddos back to school! But what about you? Are you a service member taking advantage of your military education benefits. Are you putting your toe in the online education waters for the first time as you pursue a degree? If you’re one of those adult students jumping into the world of school again for the first time in a while, check out these five habits that will help you be a success:
  1. Break it down.  No, this is not about dancing. This is about taking a good look at what you have to accomplish during the semester and deconstructing big, unwieldy goals into smaller, achievable tasks.   For example: If you know you have to read two chapters each week, break that down into ten pages a day. Or if you have a 50-page term paper due in a month, plan to write 13 pages a week. Plan the work and work the plan.
  2. Show up. It sounds easy, but we all know it’s not. Online classes are different than red brick classrooms. It can be extremely tempting to gloss over assigned videos, multi-task during lectures and slip in and out of the room. Don’t do it or (trust me) it will become a habit. A bad habit, one that causes you to miss test-worthy information and damage your grade. A huge part of success in life is simply showing up. When you don’t, you miss out. Don’t miss out.
  3. Be a joiner.  This one can be tough for introverts.  Give it a try anyway. Seek out productive study groups, labs, discussion boards, weekly Skype review sessions or any other group resources that allow you to connect with other people, clarify any confusing topics, get study hints or just exchange ideas. The biggest benefit to this is the human connection. If you’re struggling in a class you will probably find quickly that you’re not alone in your struggle. There’s strength in numbers if you’ll make room for them.
  4. Maintain.  A lot of times, people who feel pressure start neglecting the basics. Don’t. Make sure you get enough rest, eat healthfully, and exercise your body. Talk with trusted friends or family if you are stressed and listen if they offer coping suggestions.  Managing a complicated schedule leaves little time for dealing with illness or burnout. The best way to avoid either is by practicing daily self-care – especially when you don’t feel like it.
  5. Protect your time. Give family and friends clear “no-fly-zone” instructions – and enforce them. Letting people know ahead of time when you’ll be studying or doing homework sends the message that your studies are important to you, and it lets them know not to interrupt.  True friends will support your goals and be understanding if you have to decline social activities for a little while.
Success in online education is a result of hard work, discipline and persistence. It doesn’t happen by accident. It can happen for you. These tips are just a handful of key habits adopted by successful online students. Have you tried any of these tips? Tell us how they worked for you in the comments.

College Student Debt 101

Posted by Christine A. Shelly
2012_average_student_loan_debt_militaryauthority.com copyStudents in the United States spend more on higher education than those in any other country. But something is wrong with our system when an overwhelming majority of graduating seniors are carrying significant debt and an equally overwhelming number of students don’t graduate at all. In the graduating class of 2012, 70% carried student loan debt with an average of $29,400 per student. Two-thirds of all graduating seniors entered the workforce with hefty bills to pay right away. But there are some resources and options available to students who need help paying for school. Students who are serving, have served, or are married to a member of the armed forces have tremendous education benefits to draw upon. For those who haven’t finished getting a degree, there are options like online education that allow you the flexibility to work full or part time and go to school on your own schedule. According to a study by Georgetown University, in 2012 employees with a Bachelor’s degree or higher earned twice as much as those with some college/associates degree or a high school education (or less). By the year 2020, it’s predicted that at least 65 percent of all jobs will require at least some college education. And even though the job market can seem scary, an average four-year college graduate experiences less unemployment and earns a larger salary than someone with no degree or a two-year degree. In 2012, the unemployment rate for high school graduates was 17.9 percent – more than twice that of college graduates. Earning power aside, there’s a lot to be said for learning: confidence, an expanded social circle, exposure to new and different ideas are all very positive things. It might be tempting to balk at the idea of spending or borrowing money to go to school, but an education is a far better investment than nearly anything else. Sources: http://goo.gl/UIWDR5 http://www.businessinsider.com/most-inefficient-education-systems-2013-10 Image credit: http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2014/01/highly-educated-highly-indebted-the-lives-of-todays-27-year-olds-in-charts/283263/ #studentloans #studentdebt #onlineeducation

No Big Macs ® Allowed! Eat to Fuel Your Mind and Body

Posted by Christine A. Shelly

eat well for healthy body mind militaryauthority.comDuring your time in the military, you eat balanced meals in the chow hall. When you’re in the field, you get MREs. You don’t have to think about what you eat because you burn through every calorie through PT (and adrenalin). 

But once you return to civilian life, it can be hard to keep a few extra pounds off even if you’ve kept up with a good PT regimen. Whether you’ve taken a desk job or you’ve decided to go back to school to help advance your career, you probably eat more and burn fewer calories than when you were on active duty. Why does that happen?

If you’ve become accustomed to having your meals prepared by someone else or ripping open an MRE, the freedome of eating out or starting to cook for yourself can be amazing. You can make the gravy exactly how you like it! You can tackle buffets! Just thinking about the food possibilities is enough to get your salavating and hungry. 

The temptation to snack can be even greater if you’re going to school online and you’re within walking distance of the fridge and microwave in your own home while you study. Still, you wonder “What can I eat that’s healthy and not a Big Mac?” We have some tips!

Read the full details of the tips here. Even if you’ve spent 15 years in the service, the “freshman 15” can still catch up with you now. Send them packing while you take care of business.

If you have any other tips or healthy snack and meal ideas, please tell us in the comments.

 

REFERENCES:

https://plus.google.com/103506099307455368777/posts/5wPAUWKGNZp 

http://i.guim.co.uk/item-620/sys-images/Business/Pix/pictures/2008/08/06/mac4.jpg

http://blog.usfoodsafety.com/2011/10/27/educated-eating/

 

#food #healthyeating #onlineeducation

Five Expensive Things That Are Way Less Important Than Your Education

Posted by Christine A. Shelly

In my experience at Grantham University, there were a few questions that would resurface each year. The most common one is this:  “Why should I get a college degree?”

I get it. College is expensive, finding a good job right now is challenging – even if you already have a degree. And the idea of investing a couple of years of your life and (unless you’re receiving employer or military education benefits) your money without some kind of guaranteed payoff at the end can be unsettling.

At the risk of sounding like a broken record, education – a college education – is important. But why is education more valuable than certain luxuries? 

We’ve answered this question several ways before, but I wanted to frame it in a little different way today, just to help keep things in perspective. Here’s a list of things that lots of people spend money and time on that have far less impact on your future security than a college education.

 

1. SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES

militaryauthority.com education versus luxuries land rover

The average cost of a new luxury mid-size SUV is between $45,000 for a Lexus RX and $95,000 for a Range Rover. (US News & World Report 2013 Rankings).

According to the College Board, a “moderate” college budget for an in-state public college for the 2012–2013 academic year averaged $22,261. A moderate budget at a private college averaged $43,289. 

Until the day arrives that a car can get you a job or pay for your groceries, hang on to your reliable, reasonably-priced vehicle (or take the bus).


2. COFFEE

militaryauthority.com education versus luxuries starbucks

Yes, coffee costs significantly less than an SUV, but still – how much does a cup of joe really contribute to your life? Can it get you an interview? Or a promotion?  I think not.

A 2011 Consumerist report says the Average American spends about $1,100 each year on coffee. That’s a lot of money that could be put to better use. Like, say, on tuition, or textbook rental or a high-functioning laptop.


3. PET COSTUMES

militaryauthority.com education versus luxury pet costumes

The National Retail Federation estimates that 22 million people will dress up their pets for Halloween and spend an estimated $330 million on pet costumes alone. Pet. Costumes. $330 million. I’ll wait while that little factoid sinks in.

That works out to be an average of $150 per pet owner. You could rent three textbooks online for the price of Fido’s custom Darth Maul costume and accessories.


4. TEETH WHITENING

militaryauthority.com education versus luxury teeth

The average cost of dental-assisted whitening treatment is about $650 – and the 10 million people who bought over the counter whitening products spent about $140 each year for their shiny smile. 

A shiny smile is a good asset to have, and according to the American Cosmetic Dentistry Association nearly 2/3rds of Americans believe an unattractive smile can hurt your social standing. But you know what can hurt your job standing? Not having an education.


5. TICKETS TO SPORTING EVENTS

militaryauthority.com education versus luxury superbowl tickets

College sports alone can cost at least $50 per ticket per game for students. In fact, according to a survey by ticket distributor TiQ, the average single ticket price to a college football game at one of the top 25 ranked football schools is $161.08. Multiply that by the number of games in a season and if you’re a sports fan, you’re shelling out a lot of cash that could be used toward your future employability. 

It’s your future, and your financial investment. Before you plunk down your hard-earned dollars, think about what you’d rather have. Will you spend your money on discretionary “nice-to-have” items, or on where the real value is- your education and skills?  

 

REFERENCES:

https://plus.google.com/103506099307455368777/posts/hdRemHt3oqp 

http://mentalfloss.com/article/31222/numbers-how-americans-spend-their-money

http://www.nrf.com/modules.php?name=Dashboard&id=44&pmenu_id=11

http://usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/cars-trucks/rankings/suvs/

http://business.time.com/2012/01/23/how-much-you-spend-each-year-on-coffee-gas-christmas-pets-beer-and-more/

http://consumerist.com/2012/01/20/most-american-workers-spend-more-than-1000year-on-coffee/

http://www.forbes.com/sites/darrenheitner/2013/08/22/notre-dame-tops-nation-in-college-football-ticket-prices/

 

PHOTO CREDITS:

http://www.landrover.com/us/en/lr/lr4/photos-and-videos/

http://www.businessinsider.com/starbucks-high-calorie-menu-items-2013-6

https://www.poshpuppyboutique.com/Couture_Red_Dress_Collection_Russian_p/yrl-rdrussian-hd.htm

http://teethwhiteningpensinfo.com/faqs-on-teeth-whitening-procedure/

http://www.latimes.com/sports/sportsnow/la-sp-sn-2014-super-bowl-ticket-price-20130917,0,6830560.story

 

#GranthamUniversity #militaryauthority #college #bynr


What is a MOOC? A funny name for a challenge for learners

Posted by Christine A. Shelly

grantham.edu_MOOC-alternativeThere are plenty of reasons to get your degree, but higher costs and a staggering lack of time have driven many students to seek alternatives. One of those alternatives, an unfortunately-acronym-ed category of online instruction called MOOCs, has received a lot of attention lately, and for good reason. 

MOOC stands for Massive Open Online Courses – and though many claim they are revolutionary, they raise some challenging questions for students who are actively seeking a way to advance themselves in today’s often dicey job marketplace.

The premise behind MOOCs is straightforward: Who wants to spend tens of thousands of dollars to sit on your backside listening to a lecture when you could take coursework from some of the biggest names in academia online for free? In this case, the old adage is proving true: You get what you pay for. 

The MOOC model was a proposition that was intended to turn traditional education on its end. Classes are usually comprised of video lectures, assignments and discussions (interactive) – very much along the lines of what you’d get in a more conventional college, only free. And, in most cases, without the benefit of earning an actual, bona-fide degree for your effort.

Students – all of us, really – need to have something meaningful to work toward – whether it’s a sought-after degree in a competitive field, leveraging military training toward a second career, or gaining professional certification. Personal growth and lifelong learning arguments aside, students need to be able to earn something that employers recognize and assign worth to.

While the MOOCs continue to sort out their business model, there are, in fact, numerous accredited, high-quality, affordable degree programs that are recognized and valued by employers. Grantham University is one of them. 

Have you considered taking or have you taken a MOOC class?  What was your experience?  Tell us in the comments.

Read the rest of the MOOC story here.

 

REFERENCES:

https://plus.google.com/103506099307455368777/posts/JKu8V5DPiz4

https://plus.google.com/103506099307455368777/posts

http://chronicle.com/article/Ga-Tech-to-Offer-a-MOOC-Like/139245/

http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/mooc-model-challenging-traditional-education 

 

INFOGRAPHIC CREDIT:

http://www.hastac.org/blogs/cathy-davidson/2013/08/21/mooc-spoc-docc-massive-online-face2face-open-uh-oh-age-acronym

 

#GranthamUniversity #mooc #highered


Weapons Of Mass Distraction: How to Focus on School

Posted by Christine A. Shelly

MilitaryAuthority.com Distraction Free School FocusMost of us think of multi-tasking as having a super-human like ability to complete multiple tasks simultaneously. We all do it, right? We complete that research paper while checking the sports scores, we text our friends about upcoming plans while we make dinner, and we update our social networking status while we’re waiting for an email back from our boss at work. Multitasking, and all the challenges that come with it, is a way of life for many of us.

But as it turns out, our brains truly work best when they work on one thing at a time.

In an interview with the Chronicle of Higher Education, the author of the Stanford study, Ulrich Mayr, uses the example of watching television while doing homework from a textbook. While you’re following the television story, your brain won’t track with the homework. While you’re doing your homework, your brain won’t comprehend what’s going on with the story on TV.

So what happens when Captain Tangent strikes and your mind starts to wander? How do you answer your brain when it asks, “How can I concentrate better in school?”

Read three ways to take charge of distractions here.

 

REFERENCES:

https://plus.google.com/100867380494694926632/posts/BHjvTUGLBdf

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/25/business/25multi.html?pagewanted=print

Multitasking May Not Mean Higher Productivity. (2009). Talk of the Nation, National Public Radio. Found online at http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=112334449

 

Read more from Christine A. Shelly. 

#onlinelearning #onlinedistractions #militarystudents


“Weapons Of Mass Distraction” graphic by birgerking http://www.wylio.com/credits/flickr/6875893248 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Tips to Avoid Online Education Scams

Posted by Christine A. Shelly

Read more by Christine A. Shelly at Google+


militaryauthority.com online education scamsNobody wants to be called a fake or handed a phony product. Especially when your future is at stake. Phony diplomas can cost you your job, your reputation, and your future earning power. You’ve decided to pursue an online degree – but how can you tell which schools are legitimate and which could cost you more than you bargained for?  Service members, veterans and their families can protect themselves while looking for a degree program by checking for these signs:

 #1- You’ve checked the U.S. Department of Education accredited schools database and your school isn’t listed.

Military education benefits and federal student aid packages require the student to be enrolled at an accredited institution. Bogus schools are more concerned with collecting your money than they are with complying with accreditation standards or delivering quality education.

#2 – The school website, brochure, ad (or all three) make the promise of a degree in exchange for very little work, very little interaction, and a flat rate fee.

If their slogan is “Nobody turned down!” you want to turn the other direction. A degree that’s worth anything will require hard work. It’s not just handed out to anyone and everyone. Gaining knowledge, insight and experience is far more than a simple point and click consumer transaction. Few legitimate institutions charge by the degree.

#3 – They ask you for your bank account information.

A few years back, there were some schools whose “financial aid” departments contacted students and offered them scholarships or grants to attend. All they required in exchange, they said, was the student’s bank account information in order to process an administrative fee. Other schools will invite students to a mandatory financial aid “seminar,” that wind up being high-pressure sales pitches with promises of big scholarship checks for a small fee.

These schools should not only be avoided, they should be reported to the Federal Trade Commission.

#4 – The school has a name that is strikingly similar to a Big Name school.

Disreputable schools often rely on name recognition to lure students into their unaccredited programs. But where a degree from Columbia University in Missouri carries weight, a degree from Columbia State University in Louisiana does not. In fact, Columbia State University in Louisiana was closed due to court order.

When in doubt, contact your state (or the state where the school is located) attorney general’s office and confirm that it is 1) a legitimate business in good standing and 2) accredited by an accreditation body recognized by the U.S. Department of Education.

You’ve worked hard for your reputation. Protect it by selecting a reputable school. Do your research, ask questions, rely on people you know you can trust — and trust your gut. When in doubt, check out the school finder at militaryauthority.com — that’s a good place to start.

Find a School Now!

 

References:

http://www2.ed.gov/students/prep/college/diplomamills/diploma-mills.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diploma_mill

http://www.cimea.it/files/fileusers/Diploma_mills_Luca_Lantero_EN.pdf

 

Ms. Shelly has spent more than a decade working in higher education. She currently serves as executive vice president for Grantham Education Corporation. Ms. Shelly is passionate about changing lives – about making college education accessible and affordable to more people and preparing students and graduates for success.


Five Habits of Highly Successful Military Online College Students

Posted by Kelli McKinney

militaryauthority.com 5 habits of successful online studentsThe semester is underway. Books are bought. Highlighters uncapped. And yet for some military online students, there remains a lingering feeling of dread. If you’re in that crowd – already wondering if you’re going to make it to midterms, much less graduation – now is the time to turn it around.

Check out these five habits that successful students practice daily for some things you can incorporate into your routine:

  1. Break it down. No, this is not about dancing. This is about taking a good look at what you have to accomplish during the semester and deconstructing big, unwieldy goals into smaller, achievable tasks. For example: If you know you have to read two chapters each week, break that down into ten pages a day. Or if you have a 50-page term paper due in a month, plan to write 13 pages a week. Plan the work and work the plan.
  2. Show up. It sounds easy, but we all know it’s not. Online classes are different than red brick classrooms. It can be extremely tempting to gloss over assigned videos, multi-task during lectures and slip in and out of the room. Don’t do it or (trust me) it will become a habit. A bad habit, one that causes you to miss test-worthy information and damage your grade. A huge part of success in life is simply showing up. When you don’t, you miss out. Don’t miss out.
  3. Be a joiner. This one can be tough for introverts. Give it a try anyway. Seek out productive study groups, labs, discussion boards, weekly Skype review sessions or any other group resources that allow you to connect with other people, clarify any confusing topics, get study hints or just exchange ideas. The biggest benefit to this is the human connection. If you’re struggling in a class you will probably find quickly that you’re not alone in your struggle. There’s strength in numbers if you’ll make room for them.
  4. Maintain. A lot of times, people who feel pressure start neglecting the basics. Don’t. Make sure you get enough rest, eat healthfully, and exercise your body. Talk with trusted friends or family if you are stressed and listen if they offer coping suggestions. Managing a complicated schedule leaves little time for dealing with illness or burnout. The best way to avoid either is by practicing daily self-care – especially when you don’t feel like it.
  5. Protect your time. Give family and friends clear “no-fly-zone” instructions – and enforce them. Letting people know ahead of time when you’ll be studying or doing homework sends the message that your studies are important to you, and it lets them know not to interrupt. True friends will support your goals and be understanding if you have to decline social activities for a little while.

Success in online education is a result of hard work, discipline and persistence. It doesn’t happen by accident. It can happen for you. These tips are just a handful of key habits adopted by successful online students.

Have you tried any of these tips? Tell us how they worked for you in the comments.

The Best Education Advice I’ve Never Received

Posted by Christine A. Shelly

militaryauthority.com education advice ive never receivedA new school year has begun in most parts of the country. And since September 11, 2001, the start of the school year also provides a poignant reminder of freedom, democracy, and all that we hold dear. While it is true that the educational system in our country is in need of improvement in many areas, we can’t ignore the fact that few places on Earth provide the freedom to pursue the number and variety of educational and professional opportunities we have here in the United States.

Whether this marks the start of your first or final semester, the beginning of a new academic year can bring on a case of the butterflies (or worse). Many students experience anxiety and stress about their educational path and future job prospects. After more than a decade’s worth of experience in higher ed – and my own learning adventures – I have two pieces of advice that you aren’t likely to get from your education officers or even from your family.

Don’t be a follower.

You’ve probably been told by many well-wishing people “follow your passion.” Or, “follow your heart and the rest will fall into place.” Although it sounds wonderful, this kind of advice is better suited for relationships than for your education and future work.

In today’s economy, simply doing what feels good isn’t a sustainable practice – it can lead to frustration, accumulating debt, and a string of broken dreams. Plus, if you’re a working adult with a family to support while you go to school, you have responsibilities that you can’t simply shirk to follow your own interests.

Instead – bring your passion with you. Whatever you do, give it 110%. Find something to love about whatever you’re doing and give it all you’ve got. Look for the opportunity to share your passion with others and leave your own unique mark.

Strive for harmony, not balance.

“Work/Life balance,” as blissfully ideal as it sounds, is something that everyone seeks but few accomplish. It’s an incredibly popular topic that has everyone from CEOs to bloggers weighing in with their opinions and ‘how-to’s.’

Be careful about setting yourself up to achieve someone else’s idea of a balanced life. What works for them may not work for anyone else. Struggling to achieve an unrealistic ideal adds unnecessary (unhealthy) pressure.

What I would propose instead, is to strive for harmony as opposed to balance. Think about those televised singing competitions – sometimes a group is asked to sing in harmony together. It works well for some groups; others, not so much. In some groups, each of the singers wants to extend their 15 seconds of fame so badly, they sing over each other and refuse to yield the spotlight. The result is a musical mess that hurts to the ears.

Accept that there will be times when one aspect of your life takes priority over another. One area of your life will “sing lead” for a while and the others will support it and make it shine. You are the only person who can decide your priorities – your “lead singers,” if you will. Too many lead singers and you get a train wreck of a song. Too many backup singers and the music doesn’t really shine. The challenge is in making sure the right voices are singing lead at the right time.

The decision to earn your degree is one of the most important you can make, and if you’re reading this, you very likely already understand that. No matter where you are in life – whether you’re a working adult, a veteran, a military spouse or recent high school graduate, as you move forward in your educational pursuits and your professional career, you will be on the receiving end of all kinds of well-meaning advice. I hope the two pieces of advice I offered will help guide you toward achieving your goals. Best of luck to you as you begin the fall semester.

I’d love to hear from you. What kind of education or career advice has helped you? What do you wish you’d known when you started out?

 

 

REFERENCES:

http://research.collegeboard.org/sites/default/files/publications/2013/4/statisticalreport-2013-2-validity-sat-1st-yr-gpa-2010-sample.pdf

http://www.militaryauthority.com/benefits/education/reap/

http://www.whitehouse.gov/economy

 

 

Ms. Shelly has spent more than a decade working in higher education. She currently serves as executive vice president for Grantham Education Corporation. Ms. Shelly is passionate about changing lives – about making college education accessible and affordable to more people and preparing students and graduates for success.

Must-See Websites for Military Students

Posted by Christine A. Shelly

militaryauthority.com must see websites for military studentsMilitary students – that is, students who serve their country while they work toward completing a degree – have a perspective that is unique to other students. So it makes sense that the resources they need while they’re in college might be a little different than those of the average first year college student.

Below is a list of websites that we’ve found helpful for military students. From student support organizations to scholarship assistance to academic help, these are some of our favorites. We can’t possibly list them all, but if there’s a site you’ve found particularly helpful, let us know in the comments below. Be sure to tell us what you find useful about it, too.

 

Financial Support

http://www.foldsofhonor.org/

This foundation helps military families with scholarships and offers support for children and spouses of disabled or deceased service members.

 

Research/Academic support

http://calnewport.com/blog/

What started out as a college blog project has become one of the most utilized student resources on the web for study advice and strategies. Study Hacks says their mission is ‘demystifying student success.’ 

 

http://www.refdesk.com/

This is an extensive collection of reference material, databases and other resources to help you find and check facts.

 

http://www.collegeboard.org/

The CollegeBoard website has a substantial amount of information for students applying to and attending college.

 

Life/Work Resources

After Deployment – In-depth information, assessments and tools for transitioning/post-transition military.

 

http://www.archives.gov/veterans/military-service-records/

Request your service records at this website. You’ll need your military service records for college applications, plus you can have them evaluated to determine how much of your training and experience can be counted toward your degree. 

 

Studentveterans.org

Student Veterans is an organization whose focus is to empower military veterans with the educational resources imperative to success in the 21st century. They do this through support and advocacy on behalf of veterans.

 

http://www.acp-usa.org/

This website is dedicated to connecting veterans to corporate business leaders through two free programs. Bonus – Jon Stewart just joined their advisory council.

 

http://www.militaryauthority.com

And my host for this list, MilitaryAuthority.com is a site created for the military community that includes helpful information about education benefits, career planning, pay, retirement planning and healthcare benefits. There’s also a message board for locating and connecting with other military friends as well as helpful tools for finding military-friendly schools.

 

These sites are just a few of the online oases available for military students – and just fyi, mentioning them in this list does not constitute an endorsement. We weren’t compensated in any way. The Internet has made staying connected and informed so much easier – but you have to wade through a lot of garbage to get to the gems. Hopefully, this list will offer student service members a good place to start. 

 

REFERENCES:

http://www.archives.gov/veterans/military-service-records/

http://calnewport.com/blog/

http://www.militaryauthority.com/benefits/education/education-advice/

http://www.acp-usa.org/

 

 

 

Ms. Shelly has spent more than a decade working in higher education. She currently serves as executive vice president for Grantham Education Corporation. Ms. Shelly is passionate about changing lives – about making college education accessible and affordable to more people and preparing students and graduates for success.