Tagged: military students

The Education You Need for the Job You Want

Posted by Christine A. Shelly
education for the job you wantWhen a major retailer announced last week that it would increase salaries for its hourly employees, many people took notice. Whether the move was a byproduct of pressure from lobbyists or unions, no one but the decision-maker truly knows. A spokesperson for the retailer stated that this long-awaited increase was driven by the desire to retain, and attract, good employees and reduce costly turnover. This move is yet another indication that competition for jobs is fierce – and it’s also a signal that companies want to attract well qualified people – hiring for good-paying, career-building jobs. That’s good news. So what does it take to find a one of these jobs?  That’s a great question, and if we had a guaranteed solution, we could retire early. Based on a look at some of the top employers’ most sought-after jobs, the most common denominator is a bachelor’s degree. Among the top five employers from the Top 100 Military Friendly Employers list, a look at their websites reveals that they are actively hiring for a variety of roles: administrative, engineering, and human resources to name a few. Let’s take a look at what kind of responsibilities are entailed, and what kind of education is required to qualify for an Office Manager position. Administrative Roles:  Office Manager The Bureau of Labor Statistics describes these tasks as those performed by office managers or administrators regardless of the business:
  • Oversee the purchasing, storage of distribution of office supplies
  • Manage all administrative and clerical personnel
  • Oversee the budget for contracts, equipment and supplies
  • In factories, overseeing the maintenance and repair of machinery and electrical and mechanical systems.
  • Office managers also often keep track of environmental and health regulations and make sure a company adheres to those standards.
Education:  College degrees are not always required for entry-level roles in these positions, but in leadership roles, a bachelor’s degree is a requirement. A master’s in business administration can boost chances for promotion.   Engineering Roles: Industrial Engineer The BLS Occupational Handbook states that Industrial engineers typically:
  • Review production schedules, engineering specifications, process flows, and other information to understand methods and activities in manufacturing and services
  • Figure out how to manufacture parts or products, or deliver services, with maximum efficiency
  • Develop management control systems to make financial planning and cost analysis more efficient
  • Enact quality control procedures to resolve production problems or minimize costs
  • Work with customers and management to develop standards for design and production
  • Design control systems to coordinate activities and production planning to ensure that products meet quality standards
  • Confer with clients about product specifications, vendors about purchases, management personnel about manufacturing capabilities, and staff about the status of projects
Education: A bachelor’s degree in industrial, mechanical or civil engineering is a must for these roles. In addition, applicants may want to become licensed so they may carry the designation PE (professional engineer). Licensure requires:
  • A degree from an engineering program accredited by ABET
  • A passing score on the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam
  • Relevant work experience
  • A passing score on the Professional Engineering (PE) exam
  Human Resources:   Labor Relations Specialist The BLS Occupational Outlook states that Labor relations specialists typically:
  • Advise management on contracts, worker grievances, and disciplinary procedures
  • Lead meetings between management and labor
  • Draft proposals and rules or regulations in order to help facilitate collective bargaining
  • Interpret formal communications between management and labor
  • Investigate validity of labor grievances
  • Train management on labor relations
Education: Generally speaking, labor relations specialists usually have a bachelor’s degree in a human resources or business field with coursework in human resource management. However, the level of education and experience required can vary by position and employer. Some organizations prefer specialists who have had coursework in mediation.  There are universities and colleges who offer labor relations certifications, as well as a number of professional associations that offer coursework and supplementary certification programs. The next step is to evaluate your own competencies and interests. It’s important to know where your expertise can be best applied, and where you may need to seek additional education, training or credentials. Do your qualifications make you well-suited to the type of jobs employers offer? If not, education is often the best first step toward reaching your career goal.   References: http://www.forbes.com/sites/kathryndill/2014/11/11/the-top-100-military-friendly-employers/ http://www.usnews.com/news/business/articles/2015/02/25/tj-maxx-marshalls-to-follow-wal-mart-in-raising-pay

https://www.linkedin.com/company/military-veterans-employment-network-mven

By Christine A. Shelly #militarystudents #bachelorsdegree #mastersdegree #getthejobyouwant

First Semester of Online College? What You Need to Know.

Posted by Christine A. Shelly
You-are-here_Vito-DragoWhether you graduated high school last May or finished TDY last Monday, if you’re starting an online education program this fall, there are some things you can do to make every semester a success.   Make a Degree Plan Think of your degree plan as a map to graduation. Once you’ve chosen your major, you need to find out from your advisor how many credit hours are required to graduate. It’s up to you to sort out how many classes you can take each semester in order to graduate within your desired timeframe. Make a Study Plan If you’re like most online students, you’re keeping track of several schedules:  work, family commitments, guard or reserve duties. Take time at the beginning of the semester to review your course syllabi and mark class times, test dates, homework assignments, study group meetings, and other projects on your calendar so there are fewer unpleasant surprises. You will also want to carve out time to take care of yourself – set dates and times for exercise, date nights, and relaxation time so you don’t get burned out. As a general rule, for every credit hour, you should plan on 3 hours of study time per week. Show Up for Orientation and Class At an online university, new student orientation is – you guessed it – online. It’s usually a zero credit or a one credit hour course that’s required of every new student. Orientation covers key things you need to know in order to function in the online learning community. These things include how to access your coursework, how to contact your instructors, where you can go for help, how to connect with study groups, how to submit homework and take exams, and how to make tuition payments. You want to start off on the right foot. Orientation is the first step. The second step is to make sure you show up for class. Whether your class meets as a synchronous group each week, or once a month, it’s important to keep up with the work. Get Connected Similar to class on a traditional campus, the best way to meet people in an online campus environment is to get involved. Sure, there may not be pickup basketball games on the quad at an online university, but most quality online colleges and universities offer student portals where you can meet people who have interests similar to yours. You can browse through the various groups and join those that apply to you, for example: Army Veterans, USCG, Women in Law Enforcement, or Military Spouses. Social Media is also a fantastic way to meet and connect with others. You can “like” your university’s Facebook and LinkedIn pages and follow their Twitter feeds to stay up-to-date on news and events.  Stay the Course Statistically speaking, a quarter of all college students drop out during their first year. Your chances of success are greater if you can get past the initial jitters of the first few weeks. It takes, on average, three weeks to develop a new behavior into a habit. Give yourself time to adjust to your new routine, get your bearings, and get into the amazing journey that is the online college experience.   Guest post written by Christine Shelly Photo credit: Vito Drago   References:

http://www.pickthebrain.com/blog/how-to-stick-to-your-study-plan/

http://www.schools.com/articles/how-to-navigate-forums-online-student.html

http://www.lifehack.org/articles/productivity/18-tricks-to-make-new-habits-stick.html

  #onlinelearning #militarystudents

Prep for College By Doing These 3 Things Now

Posted by Christine A. Shelly
summer-college-prep_militaryauthority.comSummer is in its full glory. With all the sunshine and snow cones around, it hardly seems possible that college is right around the corner. When college starts, it can be a pretty big upheaval if you’re not ready for it. There’s a new routine to follow, new people to meet and new horizons to be explored. This can be super exciting, or terrifying, or a combination of the two. Whether you’re about to start your first semester or your final year of college, make the transition from summer to fall by doing three things… Read, read, and read some more. Your high school reading list may have been intense, but college level English literature will probably require more reading and more frequent assignments. Keep your brain nimble and prepare yourself for an increased workload by making reading a habit. Your local library may have reading lists that you can peruse for ideas. If you already have your class schedule, you could look for the syllabus or requirements and get a jump start on reading the course material. Read the other 2 tips here and then give us your own tips in the comments!   RESOURCES:

http://thechoice.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/06/27/summer-to-do/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0

http://oedb.org/ilibrarian/your-brain-on-books-10-things-that-happen-to-our-minds-when-we-read/

http://www.usnews.com/education/online-education/articles/2012/01/13/4-time-management-tips-for-online-students

#college #collegeprep #collegebound

 

What I Learned From “Gravity”

Posted by Christine A. Shelly

MilitaryAuthority.com Gravity Sandra Bullock George Clooney

In case you’ve been living under a stack of textbooks, the space-thriller Gravity opened in theaters nationwide in early October. It’s been praised as a filmmaking advance the likes of which we haven’t seen since King Kong climbed the Empire State Building. It’s also been panned as a flat, lifeless script. But love it or hate it, there are a few things we can learn from it. [Warning- mild spoilers ahead]

1. Sometimes, trouble just keeps flying at you.

The first conflict the heroes encounter in the film, in hindsight, is a small one: the mechanism Dr. Stone has created to solve a problem on the Hubble telescope doesn’t work properly. In fact, it doesn’t work at all. Then a radio communication from Houston signals the next, more ominous problem: a wave of debris is hurtling toward them. And the fun just continues from there. 

It’s exhausting. But it’s also relatable. Because we’ve all had periods of time when it seems like challenges snowball into an avalanche of trouble. When one obstacle – whether it’s a test, a deadline, or a personal challenge passes, another is often lined up right behind it. 

In the film, once the flying space trash of doom passes, the clock begins ticking. Since it’s orbiting the earth, it’s only a matter of time before it returns to wreak more havoc. And in the midst of the havoc-wreaking, the only thing anyone can do is to go through it the very best they can.

The message the film sends is one of patience and perseverance. When you’re in school or working, or both – those pieces of debris will hurtle toward you. Guaranteed. And, like the fated astronauts in “Gravity,” you can- and will – find a way to keep moving.

 

2. We can choose how we respond to catastrophe.

At one point in this film, for all intents and purposes, there is absolutely no hope whatsoever. None. Every possible route back to earth has been effectively nixed. Nothing doing. 

The decision the astronaut has to make at this point is an important one, and a lesson for everyone who’s ever felt cut off from the rest of the world, backed into a corner, or in an otherwise crummy spot: You get to decide whether you blaze forward and make your own way or fizzle out. 

Even when we feel at our most alone, we still have resources to call on, bounce ideas off of, and guide us back into orbit. That’s another important lesson from this film – the beauty of the human spirit’s resiliency and power to hope, even when the possible outcomes aren’t clear.

 

3. Perspective

There are moments in Gravity when the camera shifts to first person point of view – we see what the astronaut sees. It’s breathtaking and awe-inspiring to say the least. 

When you realize that there are astronauts occupying the ISS who see similar views of earth and space each day, it puts trivial problems like traffic, a late homework assignment or a ruined pair of khakis into perspective. It’s a good reminder that we earth-dwellers are a tiny part of the cosmos and whatever troubles we have – although they’re important to us – are temporary. 

So if you were wondering how Military Authority relates to Gravity and its stars, Sandra Bullock and George Clooney, hopefully we’ve answered your question. Whether you’re a soldier, student or spouse, there’s something to be said for an action-packed film that’s able to make hurtling through space a uniquely personal experience. It’s a space movie that grapples with the kind of human struggles you don’t have to be a rocket scientist to understand. 

 

Have you seen Gravity yet? Did it speak to you? Are there other movies that resonated with you? Tell us in the comments.

 

REFERENCES:

https://plus.google.com/100867380494694926632/posts/gcNaaJ2J97L

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravity_(film)

http://gravitymovie.warnerbros.com/#/home

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandra_Bullock

 

GRAPHIC CREDIT:

http://collider.com/gravity-review/

Copyright by Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc


#militaryauthority #gravitymovie #bullock #clooney


Five Expensive Things That Are Way Less Important Than Your Education

Posted by Christine A. Shelly

In my experience at Grantham University, there were a few questions that would resurface each year. The most common one is this:  “Why should I get a college degree?”

I get it. College is expensive, finding a good job right now is challenging – even if you already have a degree. And the idea of investing a couple of years of your life and (unless you’re receiving employer or military education benefits) your money without some kind of guaranteed payoff at the end can be unsettling.

At the risk of sounding like a broken record, education – a college education – is important. But why is education more valuable than certain luxuries? 

We’ve answered this question several ways before, but I wanted to frame it in a little different way today, just to help keep things in perspective. Here’s a list of things that lots of people spend money and time on that have far less impact on your future security than a college education.

 

1. SPORT UTILITY VEHICLES

militaryauthority.com education versus luxuries land rover

The average cost of a new luxury mid-size SUV is between $45,000 for a Lexus RX and $95,000 for a Range Rover. (US News & World Report 2013 Rankings).

According to the College Board, a “moderate” college budget for an in-state public college for the 2012–2013 academic year averaged $22,261. A moderate budget at a private college averaged $43,289. 

Until the day arrives that a car can get you a job or pay for your groceries, hang on to your reliable, reasonably-priced vehicle (or take the bus).


2. COFFEE

militaryauthority.com education versus luxuries starbucks

Yes, coffee costs significantly less than an SUV, but still – how much does a cup of joe really contribute to your life? Can it get you an interview? Or a promotion?  I think not.

A 2011 Consumerist report says the Average American spends about $1,100 each year on coffee. That’s a lot of money that could be put to better use. Like, say, on tuition, or textbook rental or a high-functioning laptop.


3. PET COSTUMES

militaryauthority.com education versus luxury pet costumes

The National Retail Federation estimates that 22 million people will dress up their pets for Halloween and spend an estimated $330 million on pet costumes alone. Pet. Costumes. $330 million. I’ll wait while that little factoid sinks in.

That works out to be an average of $150 per pet owner. You could rent three textbooks online for the price of Fido’s custom Darth Maul costume and accessories.


4. TEETH WHITENING

militaryauthority.com education versus luxury teeth

The average cost of dental-assisted whitening treatment is about $650 – and the 10 million people who bought over the counter whitening products spent about $140 each year for their shiny smile. 

A shiny smile is a good asset to have, and according to the American Cosmetic Dentistry Association nearly 2/3rds of Americans believe an unattractive smile can hurt your social standing. But you know what can hurt your job standing? Not having an education.


5. TICKETS TO SPORTING EVENTS

militaryauthority.com education versus luxury superbowl tickets

College sports alone can cost at least $50 per ticket per game for students. In fact, according to a survey by ticket distributor TiQ, the average single ticket price to a college football game at one of the top 25 ranked football schools is $161.08. Multiply that by the number of games in a season and if you’re a sports fan, you’re shelling out a lot of cash that could be used toward your future employability. 

It’s your future, and your financial investment. Before you plunk down your hard-earned dollars, think about what you’d rather have. Will you spend your money on discretionary “nice-to-have” items, or on where the real value is- your education and skills?  

 

REFERENCES:

https://plus.google.com/103506099307455368777/posts/hdRemHt3oqp 

http://mentalfloss.com/article/31222/numbers-how-americans-spend-their-money

http://www.nrf.com/modules.php?name=Dashboard&id=44&pmenu_id=11

http://usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/cars-trucks/rankings/suvs/

http://business.time.com/2012/01/23/how-much-you-spend-each-year-on-coffee-gas-christmas-pets-beer-and-more/

http://consumerist.com/2012/01/20/most-american-workers-spend-more-than-1000year-on-coffee/

http://www.forbes.com/sites/darrenheitner/2013/08/22/notre-dame-tops-nation-in-college-football-ticket-prices/

 

PHOTO CREDITS:

http://www.landrover.com/us/en/lr/lr4/photos-and-videos/

http://www.businessinsider.com/starbucks-high-calorie-menu-items-2013-6

https://www.poshpuppyboutique.com/Couture_Red_Dress_Collection_Russian_p/yrl-rdrussian-hd.htm

http://teethwhiteningpensinfo.com/faqs-on-teeth-whitening-procedure/

http://www.latimes.com/sports/sportsnow/la-sp-sn-2014-super-bowl-ticket-price-20130917,0,6830560.story

 

#GranthamUniversity #militaryauthority #college #bynr


What is a MOOC? A funny name for a challenge for learners

Posted by Christine A. Shelly

grantham.edu_MOOC-alternativeThere are plenty of reasons to get your degree, but higher costs and a staggering lack of time have driven many students to seek alternatives. One of those alternatives, an unfortunately-acronym-ed category of online instruction called MOOCs, has received a lot of attention lately, and for good reason. 

MOOC stands for Massive Open Online Courses – and though many claim they are revolutionary, they raise some challenging questions for students who are actively seeking a way to advance themselves in today’s often dicey job marketplace.

The premise behind MOOCs is straightforward: Who wants to spend tens of thousands of dollars to sit on your backside listening to a lecture when you could take coursework from some of the biggest names in academia online for free? In this case, the old adage is proving true: You get what you pay for. 

The MOOC model was a proposition that was intended to turn traditional education on its end. Classes are usually comprised of video lectures, assignments and discussions (interactive) – very much along the lines of what you’d get in a more conventional college, only free. And, in most cases, without the benefit of earning an actual, bona-fide degree for your effort.

Students – all of us, really – need to have something meaningful to work toward – whether it’s a sought-after degree in a competitive field, leveraging military training toward a second career, or gaining professional certification. Personal growth and lifelong learning arguments aside, students need to be able to earn something that employers recognize and assign worth to.

While the MOOCs continue to sort out their business model, there are, in fact, numerous accredited, high-quality, affordable degree programs that are recognized and valued by employers. Grantham University is one of them. 

Have you considered taking or have you taken a MOOC class?  What was your experience?  Tell us in the comments.

Read the rest of the MOOC story here.

 

REFERENCES:

https://plus.google.com/103506099307455368777/posts/JKu8V5DPiz4

https://plus.google.com/103506099307455368777/posts

http://chronicle.com/article/Ga-Tech-to-Offer-a-MOOC-Like/139245/

http://www.educause.edu/ero/article/mooc-model-challenging-traditional-education 

 

INFOGRAPHIC CREDIT:

http://www.hastac.org/blogs/cathy-davidson/2013/08/21/mooc-spoc-docc-massive-online-face2face-open-uh-oh-age-acronym

 

#GranthamUniversity #mooc #highered


Weapons Of Mass Distraction: How to Focus on School

Posted by Christine A. Shelly

MilitaryAuthority.com Distraction Free School FocusMost of us think of multi-tasking as having a super-human like ability to complete multiple tasks simultaneously. We all do it, right? We complete that research paper while checking the sports scores, we text our friends about upcoming plans while we make dinner, and we update our social networking status while we’re waiting for an email back from our boss at work. Multitasking, and all the challenges that come with it, is a way of life for many of us.

But as it turns out, our brains truly work best when they work on one thing at a time.

In an interview with the Chronicle of Higher Education, the author of the Stanford study, Ulrich Mayr, uses the example of watching television while doing homework from a textbook. While you’re following the television story, your brain won’t track with the homework. While you’re doing your homework, your brain won’t comprehend what’s going on with the story on TV.

So what happens when Captain Tangent strikes and your mind starts to wander? How do you answer your brain when it asks, “How can I concentrate better in school?”

Read three ways to take charge of distractions here.

 

REFERENCES:

https://plus.google.com/100867380494694926632/posts/BHjvTUGLBdf

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/25/business/25multi.html?pagewanted=print

Multitasking May Not Mean Higher Productivity. (2009). Talk of the Nation, National Public Radio. Found online at http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=112334449

 

Read more from Christine A. Shelly. 

#onlinelearning #onlinedistractions #militarystudents


“Weapons Of Mass Distraction” graphic by birgerking http://www.wylio.com/credits/flickr/6875893248 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

The College Application Process for Servicemembers

Posted by Christine A. Shelly

militaryauthority.com college application process for militaryYou’ve made the decision to apply to college. Congratulations!

But now what? Like many students, you probably have a lot of questions. Questions like:

  • How many application forms do I really have to fill out? 
  • What kind of information am I expected to provide to schools?
  • And if you’re a member of the U.S. Armed Forces, Reserves, or a military spouse, you’re probably wondering what other surprises are lurking in the application process for you.  

This post will bring a little dose of reality to what can become a very surreal process for many people.

First of all, the average complete college application is usually made up of about seven components. I say “about” seven because not every college requires every component. We’ll talk about each of these seven categories, because they’re the ones that most schools require. 

  1. Forms/Fees 
  2. Transcripts (High School, any transfer credit, military experience/training) 
  3. Test scores (SAT/ACT/unique tests)
  4. Recommendations
  5. Essays 
  6. Portfolio/Auditions – for performing arts majors 
  7. Interviews

 

Forms/Fees

About 500 colleges use an online application form called the Common Application. This is exceptionally helpful if you’re applying to half a dozen different schools and they all use the Common Application – you enter your information once, select the schools you want, and you’ve completed one step for all six of your schools at once.  Time saved. 

Before you fill out your application form(s) you’ll want to review them to determine what (if any) information you’ll need to collect from your parents. You’ll also want to find out what your high school or service branch will send directly to your potential colleges – if they won’t send transcripts or records on your behalf, you’ll want to make arrangements to send them yourself. 

Also good to know: the admission application is not the same thing as the financial aid application (or application for military education benefits). Those are two very distinct application processes.

Lastly, even when you use the Common Application, you will need to send each school their individual app fee, which can be anywhere from $35 – 100 each. Military students, military spouses and veterans may qualify for fee waivers or reimbursement through their education benefits, so if you fall into either of those categories be sure to double-check. Sometimes a school may not come out and say they’ll waive veterans’ applications fees – you have to contact the admissions office directly and ask.

Continue to the other 6 components…

 

Read more from Christine and if you’re a student, tell us how your college application process went in the comments.

 

REFERENCES:

College Application Reality Check

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/College_admissions_in_the_United_States

http://www.usnews.com/education/blogs/the-college-admissions-insider/2011/06/27/8-strategies-for-starting-your-college-application-process

http://www.nacacnet.org/research/PublicationsResources/Marketplace/student/Pages/AdmissionGuide.aspx 

 

What is the #collegeapplicationprocess like for members of #USArmedForces?


With Tuition Assistance Dried Up, Some Colleges Picking Up the Slack

Posted by Debi Teter

militaryauthority.com army national guard student loansWith thousands of active duty servicemen and women depending on at-risk Tuition Assistance funding, some colleges are cutting them a break. Columbia College, in Columbia, Missouri, for example, has announced that it is deferring tuition costs for any servicemembers whose educational benefits are affected by the shutdown. Students can seek other means of paying their tuition. If students cannot find another way to pay their tuition, the college will allow students to withdraw with no penalty.  

Grantham University, a prominent online university based in Kansas City, Missouri, has also committed to its military students that those relying on the Tuition Assistance program or other sources of federal funding can remain enrolled pending the resolution of the shutdown. The University has announced that it will work with each affected student on a case-by-case basis to discuss available funding options including scholarships, grants, VA benefits, corporate tuition reimbursement and financial aid.

Northeastern University, likewise, has announced it will not charge enlisted active-duty servicemembers for tuition “for the time being,” – a move that grants a reprieve to some dozens students who are relying on federal resources like the GI Bill and tuition assistance programs to attend school. 

“Surely DoD has existing capacity during the government shutdown to review, process, and approve on a contingent basis pending TA applications that meet current program guidelines,” wrote Northeastern University president Joseph Aoun in a letter to Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel. “This seems all the more likely in light of recent action by Congress to pay civilian employees retroactively—a measure President Obama has pledged to sign into law.“    

Austin Peay State University, in Clarksville, Tennessee, serving the Fort Campbell and Middle Tennessee/Cumberland River Valley, has also announced that it will cover the tab for active duty servicemembers. 

Because of the federal shutdown, the Department of Defense has announced that it is not funding applications for Tuition Assistance after the 1st of October. Furthermore, the Department of Veterans Affairs has announced that if the shutdown is not resolved, or funding is otherwise authorized by Congress and the President by November 1, VA educational benefits will quickly dry up. Secretary Shinseki testified this week that his department has some $6 billion in benefits due November 1, but only about $2 billion on hand to fund them. 

Colleges don’t have to extend any such extension or tuition waiver – and many colleges have not done so. Every college is different, and some colleges do not have the financial resources to extend this benefit to military members.

Tips to Avoid Online Education Scams

Posted by Christine A. Shelly

Read more by Christine A. Shelly at Google+


militaryauthority.com online education scamsNobody wants to be called a fake or handed a phony product. Especially when your future is at stake. Phony diplomas can cost you your job, your reputation, and your future earning power. You’ve decided to pursue an online degree – but how can you tell which schools are legitimate and which could cost you more than you bargained for?  Service members, veterans and their families can protect themselves while looking for a degree program by checking for these signs:

 #1- You’ve checked the U.S. Department of Education accredited schools database and your school isn’t listed.

Military education benefits and federal student aid packages require the student to be enrolled at an accredited institution. Bogus schools are more concerned with collecting your money than they are with complying with accreditation standards or delivering quality education.

#2 – The school website, brochure, ad (or all three) make the promise of a degree in exchange for very little work, very little interaction, and a flat rate fee.

If their slogan is “Nobody turned down!” you want to turn the other direction. A degree that’s worth anything will require hard work. It’s not just handed out to anyone and everyone. Gaining knowledge, insight and experience is far more than a simple point and click consumer transaction. Few legitimate institutions charge by the degree.

#3 – They ask you for your bank account information.

A few years back, there were some schools whose “financial aid” departments contacted students and offered them scholarships or grants to attend. All they required in exchange, they said, was the student’s bank account information in order to process an administrative fee. Other schools will invite students to a mandatory financial aid “seminar,” that wind up being high-pressure sales pitches with promises of big scholarship checks for a small fee.

These schools should not only be avoided, they should be reported to the Federal Trade Commission.

#4 – The school has a name that is strikingly similar to a Big Name school.

Disreputable schools often rely on name recognition to lure students into their unaccredited programs. But where a degree from Columbia University in Missouri carries weight, a degree from Columbia State University in Louisiana does not. In fact, Columbia State University in Louisiana was closed due to court order.

When in doubt, contact your state (or the state where the school is located) attorney general’s office and confirm that it is 1) a legitimate business in good standing and 2) accredited by an accreditation body recognized by the U.S. Department of Education.

You’ve worked hard for your reputation. Protect it by selecting a reputable school. Do your research, ask questions, rely on people you know you can trust — and trust your gut. When in doubt, check out the school finder at militaryauthority.com — that’s a good place to start.

Find a School Now!

 

References:

http://www2.ed.gov/students/prep/college/diplomamills/diploma-mills.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diploma_mill

http://www.cimea.it/files/fileusers/Diploma_mills_Luca_Lantero_EN.pdf

 

Ms. Shelly has spent more than a decade working in higher education. She currently serves as executive vice president for Grantham Education Corporation. Ms. Shelly is passionate about changing lives – about making college education accessible and affordable to more people and preparing students and graduates for success.