Author : kelli-mckinney

Swapping Boots for Suits

Posted by Kelli McKinney

militaryauthority.com from boots to suits military transitionDefense contractors and those within the industry itself can usually comprehend military communication quite well. But if the next job you want falls closer to corporate operations than field operations, you’ll need to think through the way your experience and skills are represented on your resume. Otherwise, making that leap from MRE to water cooler might be trickier than it needs to be.

Luckily, there are a few standard words and phrases for which a trail has already been blazed from tank to cubicle. Test your civvyspeak translation abilities by taking the quiz below:

If your resume currently contains the word “mission,” the best civilian employer equivalent is:

  1. Task
  2. Function
  3. Objective
  4. Initiative
  5. All of the above

AI, translated for a civilian resume, means:

  1. Artificial Intellectualism
  2. Additionally skilled in
  3. Alternatively increasing
  4. All about international

If you led a squad or platoon, you want to refer to the squad or platoon as a:

  1. Class
  2. Congregation
  3. Team, section or group
  4. Collection of like-minded individuals

MOS (military occupation specialty) should be referred to as:

  1. MOS
  2. Master of Science
  3. Service organization
  4. Career specialty or specialty

The civilian equivalent of reconnaissance is

  1. Game of Thrones and/or A Medieval fair
  2. A Scouting trip
  3. Data collection and analysis
  4. None of the above

Answers to the quiz are here (answers are at the bottom of this post). So how’d you do? 

In some career fields, like medical patient care, record keeping and accounting, the skills and protocol are fairly universal. If this is your field, you may not need to translate as much as say, a tank crew member. 

And remember – even though you are highly capable of managing your own career transition, you don’t have to go through this alone. Contact your transition assistance office, your service branch career and alumni program, or your installation’s family services and support employment readiness office for guidance or low/no-cost classes.

 

 

ANSWERS:

  1. E  
  2. B
  3. C
  4. D
  5. C


Fun Friday: Spooky Specters or Hooey Hokum – You Decide

Posted by Kelli McKinney

militaryauthority.com warren afb hauntedWhen you’re part of an organization with a long history like the United States Armed Forces, you are part of a proud tradition. You have stories to tell. 

Sometimes, these stories are hard to explain. Not the kind of hard to explain that you might see on grocery-store-checkout-lane magazine covers, but the kind of hard to explain that leaves the listener with a funky expression on their face.

Case in point: F.E Warren Air Force Base, Wyoming started out in the 1800s as an Army post on at the edge of the frontier named Fort David A. Russell. Originally charged with guarding the new railway, the post evolved and played key roles in events throughout our nation’s history – from the Great Sioux Indian Wars and the Spanish American War to the Philippines. By 1930, the era of the Calvary had ended. President Hoover changed the name of the fort to Francis E. Warren and F.E. Warren Air Force Base was ‘officially’ born. 

But it was born on top of an ancient native burial ground… just kidding. Sort of.

Stories of violent atrocities committed by cavalrymen against native women, men and children linger still today, and you might say they’re still around in part because the spirits won’t let Warren AFB forget. 

According to one resource, over the past 50 years, more than 150 reported events have been documented at Warren, many of them sharing spooky similarities.

For example, in one historic home known to soldiers simply as “the ghost house”, people report hearing rhythmic clunking of heavy boot steps and clicking toenails of dog’s feet pacing in the attic. Some people have reported seeing the apparition of a cavalryman and his faithful companion walking the floor together. Residents of the home have even had to adjust their décor to accommodate the dog’s preferences: when a certain picture is removed from the wall, the sound of a dog barking and whining persists until the picture is replaced. 

If you drive by one house on base, you may see a little girl with long, curly hair staring out of the guest room window. She’s been reported many times on base, particularly when the house is supposed to be vacant, but the former owners reported her presence too. Because they don’t have a little girl with long, curly hair. And the same one’s been showing up for years. 

There’s a sordid tale of marital betrayal that ended with one party accidentally hanging himself on a clothesline after jumping out of a second story window to escape his lover’s husband. Alas, to this day, residents of that home will leave a room and return it minutes later to find furniture turned wrongways, drawers opened, tables overturned – actions, they believe, of a young man who is still searching for his pants.

Warren is an impressive, massive installation, home to the 90th Missile Wing, 153rd Command and Control Squadron (Wyoming Air National Guard), 30th Airlift Squadron, Air Force Office of Special Investigations, Detachment 80, the Wyoming Wing HQ of the Civil Air Patrol and the Area Defense Counsel. These are not the kind of people who are prone to making up stories. But probably, more importantly, they’re not the kind of people who scare easily. With this in mind, revisit the question posed in the headline: Are these hauntings the real deal? Or just campfire stories?  

 

 

SOURCES:

Air Force Times

http://www.warren.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123060652

http://www.rockymountainparanormal.com/warren.html

http://www.dreadcentral.com/news/30844/cold-spots-frances-e-warren-air-force-base#ixzz2i5G54kE4

Fun Friday: Government Shutdown Edition

Posted by Kelli McKinney

militaryauthority.com fun friday twitter shutdown commentsIn light of the government shutdown, here are some of the best things we’ve found on twitter regarding this glorious example of democracy in action… 


DENISE ™ @denisealondra

“After the sequester, they will cut back on airport security. We will have to pat ourselves down.” @LateShow #shutdownjokes

 

Adam Armus @AdamArmus

Grand Canyon closed. Visit Congress for alternative gaping hole. #ShutdownSuggestions

 

The Daily Show @TheDailyShow

Museums are closed. Hit up nursing homes to see old stuff instead. #ShutdownSuggestions

 

The Canada Party @theCanadaParty

Move to Canada. Open 24 hrs. #ShutdownSuggestions


Danielle @thatdanielle

Note to self: Do not get infectious disease today. Or apparently tomorrow. And possibly the day after.

 

The Milky Way @milkscone

have you tried turning it off and on again? #ShutdownSuggestions

 

Cory Confesses @CoryConfesses

@TheDailyShow Will my taxes be prorated during the shutdown? #ShutdownSuggestions

 

Making light of these circumstances is just one way of coping. But on a serious note, we don’t think that 800,000 people without jobs is funny, nor do we think that the loss of veterans programs, benefits, or military paychecks isn’t a very serious situation. Our thoughts are with all those directly impacted by the furloughs. Which, truly, is all of us.

We the people must look after each other. Those that are able, please consider donating to your local food pantries, shelters, churches, or other support organizations.

Friday Fun: Murphy’s Laws of Combat Operation

Posted by Kelli McKinney

militarytauthority.com fun friday murphys lawsThe current state of affairs both in D.C. and abroad bring to mind a fellow named Murphy who wrote a little self-appointed law about things that can go wrong. You might be familiar with it. And even though we’re typically an optimistic bunch here at militaryauthority.com, we couldn’t help but get a kick out of some of the tongue-in-cheek variations on Murphy’s Laws we found out on the interwebs. Here are a few that made us laugh – hope they make you laugh, too.

 

If it’s stupid but it works, it isn’t stupid.

If at first you don’t succeed, call in an airstrike.

Never share a foxhole with anyone braver than yourself.

Never forget that your weapon was made by the lowest bidder.

Things which must be shipped together as a set, aren’t.

The one item you need is always in short supply.

Combat will occur on the ground between two adjoining maps.

The quartermaster has only two sizes, too large and too small.

If you really need an officer in a hurry, take a nap.

 

Did we leave out your favorite? Tell us in the comments below.

 

Sources:

http://www.ahajokes.com/war046.html

http://www.military-quotes.com/murphy.htm

Five Habits of Highly Successful Military Online College Students

Posted by Kelli McKinney

militaryauthority.com 5 habits of successful online studentsThe semester is underway. Books are bought. Highlighters uncapped. And yet for some military online students, there remains a lingering feeling of dread. If you’re in that crowd – already wondering if you’re going to make it to midterms, much less graduation – now is the time to turn it around.

Check out these five habits that successful students practice daily for some things you can incorporate into your routine:

  1. Break it down. No, this is not about dancing. This is about taking a good look at what you have to accomplish during the semester and deconstructing big, unwieldy goals into smaller, achievable tasks. For example: If you know you have to read two chapters each week, break that down into ten pages a day. Or if you have a 50-page term paper due in a month, plan to write 13 pages a week. Plan the work and work the plan.
  2. Show up. It sounds easy, but we all know it’s not. Online classes are different than red brick classrooms. It can be extremely tempting to gloss over assigned videos, multi-task during lectures and slip in and out of the room. Don’t do it or (trust me) it will become a habit. A bad habit, one that causes you to miss test-worthy information and damage your grade. A huge part of success in life is simply showing up. When you don’t, you miss out. Don’t miss out.
  3. Be a joiner. This one can be tough for introverts. Give it a try anyway. Seek out productive study groups, labs, discussion boards, weekly Skype review sessions or any other group resources that allow you to connect with other people, clarify any confusing topics, get study hints or just exchange ideas. The biggest benefit to this is the human connection. If you’re struggling in a class you will probably find quickly that you’re not alone in your struggle. There’s strength in numbers if you’ll make room for them.
  4. Maintain. A lot of times, people who feel pressure start neglecting the basics. Don’t. Make sure you get enough rest, eat healthfully, and exercise your body. Talk with trusted friends or family if you are stressed and listen if they offer coping suggestions. Managing a complicated schedule leaves little time for dealing with illness or burnout. The best way to avoid either is by practicing daily self-care – especially when you don’t feel like it.
  5. Protect your time. Give family and friends clear “no-fly-zone” instructions – and enforce them. Letting people know ahead of time when you’ll be studying or doing homework sends the message that your studies are important to you, and it lets them know not to interrupt. True friends will support your goals and be understanding if you have to decline social activities for a little while.

Success in online education is a result of hard work, discipline and persistence. It doesn’t happen by accident. It can happen for you. These tips are just a handful of key habits adopted by successful online students.

Have you tried any of these tips? Tell us how they worked for you in the comments.

Six Rules of Professional Networking

Posted by Kelli McKinney

militaryauthority.com networking for a post military jobMention networking to most people and you’ll be met with reactions that range from an audible groan and an eyeroll to a blank stare. But landing a new job today is tough, and relationships matter. After all, that’s precisely why sites like LinkedIn and their ilk exist.

In a completely-unscientific survey of people I know, four out of six got their current job through a personal referral. The referrals were not necessarily from a “friend,” but from a contact, people they met at a conference, a professional organization, and even a former employer. The other two were contacted by corporate recruiters who had viewed their resumes on a service like Monster or Indeed.

When you’ve been in the military, you have not only the network of people with whom you served, but connections through your spouse, your family, and the instant recognition that comes from having the US Armed Forces on your resume. But that doesn’t mean you won’t need to continue developing and expanding your network once you’ve left the service.

Most people don’t get excited by the prospect of networking. But if you can think of it less in terms of “do they have a job opening for me” and more along the lines of “how can I help someone,” you can find it becomes a satisfying part of your professional life.

There are tons of resources out there offering networking tips and relationship-building guidance. At the risk of bogging readers down with loads of advice, here are six simple rules of professional networking that can help you get off to a great start (or pick up where you may have left off).

 

Rule #1: Be a giver, not a taker.

 

People can spot a taker right away. He or she is a familiar face at group gatherings, with a fist full of business cards and a permanently plastered over-wide smile. This person collects (and drops) names like others might collect baseball cards: they’re neat to look at, but he only spends time on them when he  want something out of them.

When you’re building a network, you are really building a group of people you trust – and who trust you. You want to be someone your group can rely on to listen and deliver results. Focus your effort not on trying to sell yourself, but on getting to know what other people seek. When you listen, follow up and add value to their goals, they will remember and respond in kind. You have to cultivate trust – that’s not something you gain with a “what’s in it for me” attitude.

 

Rule #2: Be thoughtful.

 

Shakespeare said, “There are no small parts, only small players” about the theater, but the same can be said about building your professional relationships. No one is irrelevant, except for those who would treat people poorly. Be deliberate and thoughtful about the associations you join and events you attend. Consider people you already know as well as people you’d like to know. Both are important. You might think twice before dismissing a small group of local business owners  – it’s the quality of people in your group that matters, not quantity. It’s better to have 5 people you know well and who are willing to help each other than to have 305 contacts who don’t know much about each other or you. First think about what your contacts need and how you might be able to help them achieve their goals. Then think about your own plans.

 

Rule #3: Use your ears more than your mouth. But use them both wisely.

 

We’ve all been trapped at parties with someone who insists on telling you their life story, interrupts anything you have to say with a “one-up,” and offers unsolicited advice on problems you didn’t know you had. Don’t be that person. And if you encounter them, don’t put up with them too long, either.

Before you go anywhere there might be an opportunity to network, prepare two or three questions as conversation starters, and prepare graceful exit lines for those situations where it’s clear the other person is a “taker” (see Rule #1).

There’s a reason villains always monologue. Heroes are too busy helping other people to talk. If your conversation partner seems like more of a Joker than a Batman, make a graceful exit. Networking is about building a mutually-beneficial, trusting relationship. You have to demonstrate you’re there for the good of others as well as yourself.

 

Rule #4: Keep it professional.

 

It’s true that networking can happen on the sidelines of your child’s soccer game as easily as it can happen at a professional meeting. But if you’re reaching out to people with the sole purpose of giving or getting professional advice or advancement, keep to a professional setting. Don’t hound contacts on the playground or grocery store. Some day a friendship could develop, sure, but until everyone involved is comfortable with that, keep professional boundaries at all times.

Professional boundaries include taking steps to prevent unnecessary gossip and inappropriate assumptions on other peoples’ part. Don’t meet outside the office with people of the opposite gender. It might seem old fashioned and a bit absurd, but people tend toward speculation and gossip, and your professional reputation is too important to risk. Lunch with the boss or co-worker in a well-lit, busy restaurant could be acceptable, but no dinner/drinks/dessert in any quiet, dark place that might suggest you’re trying to hide something.

Having said that: If someone’s behavior makes you uncomfortable – if they’re calling or emailing too much, perhaps acting like they’re a bit too familiar with you, set them straight clearly but gently. And let a friend or family member know what’s going on so they can help if needed.

 

Rule #5: Spread wealth and expect nothing.

 

Just because you’ve had a great conversation with someone doesn’t mean they are obligated to do anything for you. In fact, now that you’ve had a great conversation, the ball is in your court to follow up – not theirs. Once you’ve made a connection, it’s time to start learning more about them. Your new contacts’ interests, challenges, and needs all offer you an opportunity to demonstrate your value. Follow up with a brief, specific email or phone call that shares something worthwhile and shows sincere interest. Here’s some ideas for following up after a connection at an association function:

Email: John, I enjoyed our conversation Thursday about your widget project. The attached article on widgets 3.0 caught my attention and I thought I’d share. Would like to hear your thoughts on it when you have a chance. Best regards, Jamie

Phone call: Hi John, this is Jamie – we met at Thursday’s AWA meeting and talked about your widget project. I’d love to send you a copy of an article I just read on widgets 3.0 – would that be okay?

Delivery: Pick up a copy of the publication or copy the relevant article and either drop it off personally or send it in the mail to your new contact with an attached note similar to email above.

The very best thing you can do to grow your network is share information. Whether it’s something you’ve read, a tool you’ve acquired, or music you’ve heard, share something with your connections that’s relevant and useful to them. Your contact may or may not respond to your attempts. They may even say “no, thanks” when you offer something. Don’t take it personally. Simply chalk it up as a learning experience and move on. Either way, you gain information and practice. There’s nothing wrong with that.

 

Rule #6: Networking is a lot like brushing your teeth: You must do it daily for best results.

 

Networking is a habit. When you do it a little bit each day, it doesn’t seem quite so overwhelming and the results consistently pile up. Make no mistake, though: Networking is often disguised as work. Volunteer opportunities, group projects, committee activities – all are great opportunities to meet some fascinating people and learn about them. You can also make a habit of introducing two people with the same backgrounds, interests, or goals. What happens next is up to them, but do this a few times and you become the go-to resource for people in your network who seek to meet new talent.

Now what?

Getting started is a lot simpler than you might think. Consider who your network is and think about who you want it to include. Pick up the phone, use email, or go to an event or activity. Be sincere. Listen. Be useful. That’s pretty much it, and it’s not so scary when you think about it that way.

Do you have any networking strategies or stories to share? We’d love to hear them. Dish them out in the comments below.

Create a Personal Scorecard to Ease Transition

Posted by Kelli McKinney

militaryauthority.com transition to civilian lifeIf you’re this guy, you have a pretty solid life plan going. You’ve reverse engineered your career, starting with your vision of successful retirement, and back-stepped your way toward where you are now. It’s highly probable that you have either physically or mentally documented every milestone along the way. Kudos to you, and you can stop reading this now and go read something VanSteenwyk wrote.

If you’re like the rest of us, you need a little help from time to time. One tool that gets results in both the professional and the personal world is the scorecard. The scorecard works because it prompts you to consider your decision-making criteria, set standards, and evaluate against your standards.

The scorecard method can help you weigh your options as you prepare to transition into the civilian world. For example, if you’re considering relocation from your current post, you might be interested in living in New York, Albuquerque, and LaJolla. Your scorecard might look like this: 

 

 

 NYC

 Albuquerque

 LaJolla

Cost of housing

   1

   2

   1

Job opportunities

   3

   2

   1

Friends/Family near

   1

   3

   1

Weather

   2

   2

   3

TOTAL

    7

    9

    6

 

In this scorecard, we’ve set four criteria for evaluation: housing, jobs, friends/family, and weather (you can set your own criteria). On a scale of 1-3, with one being poorest and three being best, we ranked each city based on those criteria. Cost of housing is highest in NY and LaJolla; it’s okay in Albuquerque. This example is a pretty simple one, but you can create your own and make it as complicated or simple as necessary.

You can weight the scorecards if you want to add an element of complexity. Using the same criteria and subjects from above, let’s look at how weighting can add value to your scorecard. 

 

 Weight

 NYC

 Albuquerque

 LaJolla

Cost of housing

   2

   2

   4

   2

Job opportunities

   4

   12

   8

   4

Friends/Family near

   3

   3

   9

   3

Weather

   1

   2

   2

   3

TOTAL

 

   19

   23

   12

 

First we ranked the criteria in order of importance – we thought job opportunities were most important, so we gave it our highest weight (4). Friends, housing cost, and weather followed (in that order). Then we went through our previous scores and multiplied them by their weight – the resulting number is our weighted score.

The beauty of the scorecard exercise is that it imposes a structure to your decision-making process, and structure is a good thing to have when you’re making life decisions. If you’re deciding whether or not go to back to school, scorecards definitely come in handy during the selection process – so does our school finder, which you can visit here or from the military authority web site. What other tools do you turn to help you with important choices? Let us know in the comments below.

A Shift in Mindset Can Help Military Spouse’s Employment Search

Posted by Kelli McKinney

militaryauthority.com military spouse employment searchMarriage – whether military or civilian – is about cooperation. It’s hard work making a relationship between two unique people successful. And when one (or more) of those people are committed to a military career, it can feel like there’s a third person in the relationship at times. A military marriage often contains the needs and well being of three: the two spouses plus the nation.

Most military spouses are extremely proud of their career soldier, and share similar views of service, honor, duty, and integrity, whether or not they choose a military career for themselves. But what happens when the career aspirations of one spouse need to take a back seat to the other?

That’s not an uncommon situation in marriage. The vision of a 50-50 partnership might be a bit short-sighted, when you consider that, very likely, the single constant in any marriage is the love and commitment shared between the two people. Everything else – jobs, homes, hobbies, possessions, kids – changes.  Perhaps these few simple tips can help bring the military spouse some peace in their search for employment.

  1. Who you are is more important than what you do. Are you passionate about reading, or music? Do you have a passion for nutrition, or science, or serving others? Think about what you can contribute as opposed to whether your particular field has a set career path to follow (spoiler: most don’t). If you’re between jobs at the moment, just spending a little time doing something you enjoy – or even taking classes to learn about something you’re interested in – can help.
  2. You’re a professional. If you think of yourself as “an unemployed sales representative,” or “out-of-work aerobics instructor” guess what you’ll probably be? But if you shift your thoughts just a little bit, away from limiting job titles and toward what you want to do, that opens up your potential. For example, “sales rep” above might consider himself a “professional influencer.” The “aerobics instructor” might switch gears into “fitness professional.” This slight shift can help you make the leap from feeling like you’re being shuffled from job to job to realizing that you have knowledge and experience to give. Even if you have to wait tables a little while in a new town while you seek new opportunities, changing the way you think about your skills can make a huge difference.
  3. Remember why you’re here. It’s easy to get discouraged and bitter during a dry spell. Thinking of happier times, and remembering the excitement of the early days of your adventure will help the discomfort pass. Share your feelings with your spouse, friends or family, and remember that your service member also has days like this – you will carry each other through them.

Get more practical career advice and education tips for military spouses at militaryauthority.com.

The Five Most Useful Online Degrees for Transitioning Military

Posted by Kelli McKinney

militaryauthority.com useful online degrees for transitioning militaryThere’s no question that having a degree can open up job options for transitioning military members. But with the slew of degree options out there, how can service members tell which ones are the most relevant for today’s workplace? Plus, making the transition from military service to civilian life can be stressful enough without adding the added complication of going back to school.

Adding school to your work-life-transition mix can actually help simple things up, especially if you choose an online degree program. Online education programs offer flexibility, access to schools that might not be geographically easy to get to, and the ability to fit school into your life – not cram life around your school.

And if you choose one of these in-demand programs, you are signing up for a competitive edge, not just a piece of paper.

 

Bachelor’s in Business Administration

Why It’s Hot: Education Dynamics and Learning House’s recent study ranked business administration as the top online undergraduate degree program. Nearly one-third of all online students are studying business administration. Why? Because people want to understand the intricacies and theories of successful business, channel their inner entrepreneur and help improve our straggling economy.

What You Could Study: Business administration majors usually study operations management, economics, accounting, marketing, and organizational dynamics or structure, according to the College Board.

What You Can Do With It: A more appropriate question is “what can’t you do with it?” A wide variety of career paths open up in business and industry with a degree in business administration. Graduates can work in fields banking, finance, manufacturing, product development, human resources, and business analysis, all of which offer opportunities for advancement and professional development. 

Bonus: An online Masters in Business Administration is not only a terminal degree, just the act of completing it can give you the real life experience and understanding of what it means to lead a company while maintaining your personal life. That real-time work-life balance experience is priceless, and teaches you what it takes to take the business world by storm.

Potential Careers and Average Salaries:*
Marketing manager: $122,720
Financial manager: $116,970
Management analyst: $87,260

 

Bachelor’s Degree in Education

Why it’s Hot: A second career in education is a viable, honorable, rewarding career for many vets, and studying online is an accommodating way to transition from service to civilian life.

What You Could Study: Online bachelor’s degrees in education teach students about instructional design, education theories and methods, and offer a combination of self-directed classwork with hands-on practice. Online communities also provide a convenient, fulfilling way to connect with other students and share ideas.

What You Can Do With It:  You can take what you’ve learned and experienced and help shape the next generations of students, contribute to education policy by getting involved in educators’ groups or educational administration. 

Bonus: The Department of Labor confirms that the route to a career as a public school teacher is a pretty straightforward path. You earn a bachelor’s degree from a teacher education program, and then pass a license exam.

Potential Careers and Average Salaries:*
Elementary school teacher: $54,330
Middle school teacher: $54,880
High school teacher: $55,990

 

Bachelor’s Degree in Computer Science

Why It’s Hot: Technology changes each day. Nearly every company needs someone who understands it, can create it, wrangle it, or help other people use it. Plus –why study computer science offline? If you love technology, computers, and have a knack for both the creative and the technical, this is the field for you.

What You Could Study: Computer science majors study programming, web technologies, software design and theory, artificial intelligence, system analysis and digital systems.

What You Can Do With It: Network and computer systems administrators, application developers and software developers usually have at least a bachelor’s degree in computer science.

Bonus: This is a high-growth field that the Department of Labor predicts will see almost 50 percent increase in wage-and-salary employment between now and 2018. 

Potential Careers and Average Salaries:*
Computer and information systems manager: $123,280
Computer systems analyst: $81,250
Network and computer systems administrator: $72,200

 

Bachelor’s Degree in Human Resources

Why it’s Hot:  Companies are made up of people – human beings – and organizations will always need people who understand organizational structure, group behavior, laws and technologies that support human resources.

What You Could Study:  The College Board reports that most human resources programs include coursework in staffing, employment law, performance management, organizational structure and behavior, personnel actions, and payroll management. 

Bonus: The business of human resources is increasingly reliant upon technology. An online degree program offers an opportunity to become adept at some of these technologies. 

Potential Careers and Average Salaries:*
Training and development specialist: $57,280
Compensation, benefits, and job analysis specialist: $59,590
Human resources manager: $108,600

 

Bachelor’s Degree in Criminal Justice

Why it’s Popular: It’s human nature to be intrigued by the seedy underbelly of criminal activity. Plus, because human nature is not geographically limited, you could be taking classes with students from all over the world.

What You Could Study: Every aspect of crime, criminal behavior, the justice system, and the law. You could take courses in criminology, law enforcement, statistics and sociology.

What You Can Do With It: A criminal justice degree holder could work at the local, state, or federal level in law enforcement, the corrections system, homeland security, or immigration.

Bonus: The qualities that support a successful military career are also some of the same qualities that drive a successful career in law enforcement. You already know you have what it takes to succeed.

Potential Careers and Average Salaries:*
Police and sheriff’s patrol officer: $55,620
Detective and criminal investigator: $73,010
Probation officer and correctional treatment specialist: $51,240

*All career and average salary information comes from the U.S. Department of Labor, May 2010 statistics. There could be variances depending upon the level of degree completed.

Ready to get started? Click below to find an online school that’s right for you.

 

Five Hot Jobs for New Grads

Posted by Kelli McKinney

new college graduatesCollege graduations were happening all around us last month. With a little hard work and preparation, all those hours of study will pay off with that most coveted reward: A job.

That’s right –the job market is now full of another fresh wave of newly-minted college graduates just like you. If you haven’t already begun networking, interning, crafting a resume, volunteering and applying for work, now’s the time to get cracking.

In today’s competitive job market, it’s hard to know where to look to find professional, entry-level, well-paying positions.

Below are five solid, professional, entry-level positions for career-minded people who have earned their degree. These jobs are excellent launching pads for careers, have realistic starting salaries and offer potential for long-term professional growth.

And as a bonus, if you are a military spouse or dependent, or if you are planning to leave the service in the next year or so, working towards a degree in these fields can still pay off down the road. They are all expected to remain as hot jobs for the next few years.

 

Web Designer

If You Are: A hybrid, as keen with the technical as you are the creative. You stay abreast of technological developments, are deadline-oriented and enjoy teamwork.

And You Have: A bachelor’s degree in information technology, computer science or related field.

Then You Can: Design Web sites and develop Web applications.

Salary and Growth Potential: Entry level Web designers generally earn a median salary of $50K. Those with more experience usually gain greater responsibility, including managing staff and more complex projects.

 

Computer Programmer

If You Are: An adept creator and problem solver.

And You Have: A bachelor’s degree in computer science.

Then You Can: Write and develop computer programs.

Salary and Growth Potential: Entry-level computer programmers typically earn a median salary of $54K. Those with a successful track record can grow into supervisory or managerial roles with additional responsibilities.

 

Database Analyst

If You Are: Someone with superb attention to detail and a methodical approach to problem solving, with a knack for uncovering project requirements and underlying needs.

And You Have: A bachelor’s degree in computer science or a related field.

Then You Can: Develop, coordinate and manage databases.

Salary and Growth Potential: Entry-level database analysts generally earn a median salary of $55K. Solid performance usually results in advancement to supervisory and managerial level.

 

Environmental Engineer

If You Are: An inquisitive person with excellent research skills who loves both the environment and problem solving.

And You Have: A bachelor’s degree in engineering.

Then You Can: Engineer solutions that work to control environmental health hazards.

Salary and Growth Potential: Entry-level environmental engineers usually earn a median salary of $52K while working with more experienced engineers. Successful performance will yield additional responsibility.

 

Marketing Coordinator

If You Are: An observer and appreciator of behavioral trends with keen research and strategic skills.

And You Have: A bachelor’s degree in business, marketing or economics.

Then You Can: Assist with product or service demand forecasting, demographic analysis and campaign planning.

Salary and Growth Potential: Entry-level marketing coordinators earn a median salary of $49K. Strong performance and experience can result in advancement to manager, director or vice president.

 

Regardless of the job field, an investment in your education is an investment in your growth potential. If you haven’t selected your degree program yet, research areas that are a good fit with your personal strengths, interests and career development potential.

Military students can also prepare by discussing their transition into school or civilian workforce with a transition counselor.

Find a school that fits your education goals with our School Finder and start planning your new career now! 

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