Seven Tips for Successful Interviews

Posted by Kelli McKinney

interviewingYou’ve heard it before: You only have one chance to make a great first impression. Those crucial first few minutes of a job interview can make or break your chances to get an offer – or at least a next interview. 

Whether you’re a service member, military retiree, or military spouse, if it’s been while since you’ve interviewed for a job, take a look at these simple tips to help you amaze and astound your prospective new boss. In a good way.

  1. Bring extra copies of your resume.
  2. Arrive early.
  3. Make eye contact and sit up straight.
  4. Use language that demonstrates you know their industry – or at least have done a little research.
  5. Speak clearly and professionally – no slang, profanity, complaining or abbrevs.
  6. Ask relevant questions about the job and the company that demonstrate your interest and your abilities.
  7. Always send a follow-up thank you letter or email.

Above all, relax, do your best, and know that the right job for you is just around the corner.  And if you’re thinking about taking your skills and knowledge to the next level, check out our school finder for an easy way to research the best school for you.

 

Have you had any luck interviewing for a new job as a military spouse or transitioning servicemember? Please tell us about your experience below.

 


One response to “Seven Tips for Successful Interviews”

  1. Scott Cookman says:

    1. Bring extra copies of your resume. – No problem if someone has translated your experience into civilian terms. 
    2. Arrive early. – No problem we’re never late! 
    3. Make eye contact and sit up straight. – No problem, review boards make us do that. 
    4. Use language that demonstrates you know their industry – or at least have done a little research. Problem, this assumes we can already do that. 
    5. Speak clearly and professionally – no slang, profanity, complaining or abbrevs. – Problem! Acronyms and abbrevs. are our language and decompressing these to their full text won’t change things. This is assuming we can translate from military to civilian terms. 
    6. Ask relevant questions about the job and the company that demonstrate your interest and your abilities. Problem! In depth intelligence is not easily possible without visual supporting documents. 
    7. Always send a follow-up thank you letter or email. Problem! Large corporations will not readily hand out addresses or emails anymore due to thousands of applicants. Even if obtained, there will be no reply. 
    8. NOT MENTIONED – Large companies now will not personally respond if not selected, nor are they willing to provide feedback to help you improve either your interviewing skills or training to become competitive with civilian counterparts.